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Kfc's Marketing Plan In Malaysia
 
 
KFC and its Marketing Plan in Malaysia

Index:
Introduction ……………………………………………………………3
Social and Cultural Analysis …………………………………………..4
Political Analysis ………………………………………………………6
Economic Analysis …………………………………………………….9
Market Analysis ………………………………………………………13
Situational Analysis …………………………………………………..17
Marketing Plan ………………………………………………………..18
Conclusions and Recommendations ………………………………….27
Appendix ………………………………………………………….…..28
References …………………………………………………………….31
Introduction:
Kentucky Fried Chicken, usually known as KFC, is a chain of fast food restaurants based
in Louisville, Kentucky. KFC was a wholly owned subsidiary of Tricon from 1997-2002,
and has been a wholly owned subsidiary of Yum! Brands since 2002. The chain also
advertises itself as Poulet Frit du Kentucky or PFK in the province of Quebec in Canada.
KFC primarily sells chicken in form of pieces, wraps, salads and burgers. While its
primary focus is fried chicken KFC also offers a line of roasted chicken products, sides
and desserts. Outside of North America, KFC offers beef based products such as burgers
or kebabs, pork based products such as ribs and other regional fare. The popularity and
novelty of KFC has led to the general formula of the fried chicken fast-food restaurant
being copied by restaurant owners worldwide.
The company was founded as Kentucky Fried Chicken by Colonel Harland Sanders in
1952, though the idea of KFC's fried chicken actually goes back to 1930. The company
adopted the abbreviated form of its name, KFC, in 1991. Starting in April 2007, the
company began using its original appellation of Kentucky Fried Chicken again for its
signage, packaging and advertisements in the United States as part of a new ...
 
 
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Franchise Vs. Business Opportunity

To the untrained eye, franchise and business opportunity investments look pretty much the same. Both invite you to purchase a package of goods and services and business concepts. Both offer you the chance to capitalize on a business idea that has already proved to be successful. Both provide some training, handholding and access to a valuable marketplace.
In reality, though, there are huge differences between the two concepts. While these fundamental distinctions sometimes appear subtle, detecting and understanding them can help you protect yourself when you take the plunge into your new business.
If there's one telltale difference between a franchise and a business opportunity, it's the role of a trademark. The licensing of trademark rights is a hallmark of franchising: Every franchisee of a McDonald's, Subway or Holiday Inn is operating under a trademark license. The consistent image portrayed by these and other franchise systems symbolizes their strength in the marketplace, and is the direct result of a trademark license. If a program grants you the right to operate under a trademark owned by the seller, you're most likely looking at a franchise rather than a business opportunity.

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